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It seems I cannot stress enough…

…that I’ve relocated to travelersinthetardis.

It worries me that there haven’t been many questions or concerns over there as of lately. You humans are always busy with your ‘smartphones’ and your ‘tablets’ and such. You always seem to be plugged into something. So please, if anything comes up, anything at all, that you wish to inform me of, don’t hesitate to drop me a message.

And now I will be ‘logging off’ from this place. Too many memories I don’t wish to think about.

-Doctor

PS. Oh! And it seems Clara has found this place already. I’ll have to speak to her about her hacking habits… Anyways, she’s over there too. Sometimes, at least. If you would like to speak with her as well, please do so. It’ll keep her out of trouble.

1 year ago on May 12th, 2013 | J | 0 notes

Ooh, what have we here?

The Doctor never mentioned this blog. He only lets me on the other one, but shhh!

Chin Boy’s clever, but not as clever as meee~ ;)

-Clara

1 year ago on May 6th, 2013 | J | 1 note
1 year ago on December 9th, 2012 | J | 1 note

“Come along, Ponds.”

1 year ago on November 18th, 2012 | J | 34 notes

…Hello again.

Sorry I’ve been away. River said it was time for a vacation.

She also said something about ‘starting over’ and to ‘quit moping around’ or something like that. She’s even created a new communication line through which I can be contacted.

I suppose if anyone needs me, drop a message over here. I will try to check back here every once in a while, but River is adamant about me leaving it be so I can have a clean break.

So… That’s that.

-Doctor

1 year ago on November 17th, 2012 | J | 1 note

“You’re seared onto my hearts, Amelia Pond.”

1 year ago on November 17th, 2012 | J | 36 notes

doctorwho:

“Oh Amy, I hear the song of your sadness.”

alicexz:

“Oh Amy, I hear the song of your sadness.”
“I’m not sad.”
“Then why are you crying?”

Spent many, many hours livestreaming and working on this painting - my tribute and goodbye to the magnificent Amy Pond (and how she inspired the greatest painter that ever lived!) I of course purposely researched Van Gogh works such as Starry Night and Sunflowers and would like to think if Amy stayed for a portrait, Vincent painted something like this.

“The Song of Your Sadness” is a companion piece to “The Roar of Our Stars.

1 year ago on November 17th, 2012 | J | 25,102 notes
doctorwho:

New Scientist: If The Doctor had a camera, it might look like this

IT’S a still image that is more about time than space. Remarkably, the picture has not been Photoshopped: it’s simply a different way of looking at the world. If The Doctor had a camera, he might take shots like this. And as it happens, the title sequence for the BBC show in the 1970s was created with a similar “slit-scan” technique.
Slit-scan cameras take many images in vertical slices, and stack them side by side. The result is that anything stationary, in the background, appears blurred, while anything passing by the slit jumps out at you, clear against the smear. This photo shows a field in Siem Reap, Vietnam, taken by photographer Jay Mark Johnson of Venice, California.
It’s hard to get your head around. The camera views the world through an unmoving vertical slit, taking successive shots over time. The left side of the image here corresponds to the earlier shots and the last sliver on the far right is the most recent. It’s a time-panorama. The background didn’t move, so is smeared out, but the farmer and his buffalos passed by. If the farmer had stopped for a while in front of the slit he would appear elongated; had he raced past the camera, he would appear compacted.
“I make photographic time lines,” Johnson says on his website. “Because the photographs seamlessly blend visual depictions of space and time into a single hybrid image they provide an altered ‘spacetime’ view of the world.”

doctorwho:

New Scientist: If The Doctor had a camera, it might look like this

IT’S a still image that is more about time than space. Remarkably, the picture has not been Photoshopped: it’s simply a different way of looking at the world. If The Doctor had a camera, he might take shots like this. And as it happens, the title sequence for the BBC show in the 1970s was created with a similar “slit-scan” technique.

Slit-scan cameras take many images in vertical slices, and stack them side by side. The result is that anything stationary, in the background, appears blurred, while anything passing by the slit jumps out at you, clear against the smear. This photo shows a field in Siem Reap, Vietnam, taken by photographer Jay Mark Johnson of Venice, California.

It’s hard to get your head around. The camera views the world through an unmoving vertical slit, taking successive shots over time. The left side of the image here corresponds to the earlier shots and the last sliver on the far right is the most recent. It’s a time-panorama. The background didn’t move, so is smeared out, but the farmer and his buffalos passed by. If the farmer had stopped for a while in front of the slit he would appear elongated; had he raced past the camera, he would appear compacted.

“I make photographic time lines,” Johnson says on his website. “Because the photographs seamlessly blend visual depictions of space and time into a single hybrid image they provide an altered ‘spacetime’ view of the world.”

1 year ago on November 5th, 2012 | J | 3,224 notes
default album art
Played: 89,373 times.

doctorwho:

Matt Smith reciting the Gunpowder Plot.

Remember, remember,
The Fifth of November,
Gunpowder treason and plot….

1 year ago on November 5th, 2012 | J | 17,724 notes

Hello, Sweetie!

Professor River Song here, invading your personal space again, dearie.

Just thought I’d check in for a bit to see how you’re holding up.

Maybe I’ll even stay awhile.

-River

1 year ago on November 4th, 2012 | J | 0 notes